10 minutes with Bob Croslin

Interviews with Photographers February 21, 2012 8:49 am
When did you first know that you wanted to be a photographer?

 

I spent most of my time in high school hanging out in the darkroom skipping class. I was a punk-rock kid who photographed my friends skateboarding, and the darkroom was a place I could hide from the jocks and rednecks and develop film and be creative. I was bored in high school,  but I had an amazing photography teacher that would let me hang out in her classroom. When I graduated, several of my friends became pro skateboarders. Because I was the guy with the camera, I became their official photographer. I shot ads, and occasionally had an image run in Transworld or Thrasher. I almost never got paid. It quickly became apparent I wasn’t going to be able to make a living as a skateboard photographer. This was the late 80’s-early 90’s when “extreme” sports weren’t a multi-million dollar enterprise. I met my wife Leslie and she was headed to the University of Florida. I decided to tag along and I ended up in journalism school. That changed everything. I met many amazing people that opened my eyes to the potential of photography. That’s when I fell in love with telling stories with a camera.

 

Bob Croslin

Bob Croslin

Bob Croslin

 

Who were some of the first photographers that inspired you?

The two that inspired me most I met in college and continue to inspire me to this day: Robert Browman who helped found MediaStorm and VII member Stephanie Sinclair. Other photographers that helped shape my photography are J Grant Brittain (the father of modern skateboard photography), Alex Webb who’s FL work blew my mind, Richard Avedon, Mary Ellen Mark and Sally Mann.

 

 

Bob Croslin

Bob Croslin

 

If you could go back ten years, what advice would you give yourself?

 

It’s a marathon, not a sprint. We’re hard-wired for instant-gratification, but building a career doesn’t happen overnight. You have to wake up everyday willing to do the hard work. Just because you’ve landed a big commercial job or a feature spread in a magazine, doesn’t mean other jobs are going to come flooding in. Everyday you push the rock a few feet up the hill whether it be through marketing, shooting personal work or networking.

 

 

Bob Croslin

Bob Croslin

 

Bob Croslin

Bob Croslin

 

Any words of wisdom for the up and comers?
Lots of people have talent, but it’s the hard work that sets you apart.

 

 

(Bob is based in Florida. See more of his work, here)

7 Comments

  • This is awesome. Bob’s a good guy and a great talent. It’s nice to see him getting recognition.

  • Bob’s work is great, thanks for posting! His comments about putting in the work are right on the money. Its easy to feel comfortable when you land a new big job… but its that exact moment when you need to tell yourself that you can’t stop working hard.

    Props to Bob on the killer portfolio!

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